A carer is anyone who spends a lot of time looking after a relative, partner, friend or child who is ill or frail or has a physical, mental health or learning disability.

Most people who look after relations or friends are happy to do so, but sometimes they need help and support to continue providing care.

Contact us

020 7926 5555
Lambeth Adults' and Community Services

Sections in this guide (click title to view)

1. Lambeth Carers' Awards

If you know a very special carer whose exceptional efforts should be rewarded, then please nominate them for the Lambeth Carers' Awards 2013.

The Carer of the Year Awards 2013 will recognise an unpaid carer whose efforts in providing care to someone else are, in the opinion of the judges, particularly exceptional and deserving of additional recognition. This may be through overcoming particular difficulties or barriers, tackling specific challenges, having addressed unusual or unexpected circumstances, or having been particularly creative or innovative in finding a solution to a challenge or problem to the benefit of the person they are caring for.

To nominate your carer of the year, complete the Carer of the year nomination form and email it to carersawards@lambeth.gov.uk or post it to:

Molly Telesford
Carers Awards 2013
London Borough of Lambeth
7th Floor
Phoenix House
10 Wandsworth Road
London SW8 2LL

The closing date for nominations is 16 August 2013.

Criteria

The Carer of the Year Award 2013 will recognise the entered unpaid carer whose efforts in providing care to someone else are, in the opinion of the judges, particularly exceptional and deserving of additional recognition.

This may be through overcoming particular difficulties or barriers, tackling specific challenges, having addressed unusual or unexpected circumstances, or having been particularly creative or innovative in finding a solution to a challenge or problem to the benefit of the person they are caring for.

We define a carer as someone who:

  • gives help and support to someone who, due to disability, illness or frailness, is unable to manage living in their own home without help
  • could look after spouses, partners, children, parent(s), sibling(s), other relatives, neighbours and friends
  • are unpaid, could be any age, and could live with or apart from the person they care for.

To be eligible, carers must be Lambeth residents or caring for a Lambeth resident. They cannot be a serving Member or Officer of Lambeth Council.

2. Carers' breaks

Everyone needs time off from the physical and mental demands of caring. Many carers want to take full responsibility for the person they care for. However, it is important that you look after yourself too.

Even a short break can help you to come back to your caring role refreshed and better able to continue caring.

Arranging a carer's break

There are many different ways of organising a break, be it for an hour a week, a holiday, or regular help with the day-to-day tasks of caring. The important thing is to know that the person you care for is safe.

There is no fixed entitlement to carers' breaks, and it is important to remember that arranging a break can take some time.

For some carers' breaks, you need to have an assessment first with social services. For others, you can refer yourself to the organisations.

To begin a discussion about arranging a carer's break, please contact us.

Resources are limited and we must ensure that arranging help, care and support for those in need comes first. This may mean that we cannot always provide the carers' breaks that you would like, or meet your needs in the way you might prefer.

Types of carer's break

Here are some of the types of carers' breaks that may be available to you.

Fix yourself a break

The Fix Yourself A Break (FYAB) scheme aims to help carers who need support. Under the scheme you could apply for a one-off payment of up to £200 to help to pay for a short break or to buy goods and services to support you in your role as a carer.

Time for you

There are some services that offer you a chance to take time for yourself to relax and offer a range of alternative therapies.

There are some others that will give you a chance to meet up with other carers for a few hours, knowing that the person you care for is being looked after.

Sitting services

With this type of service, you can have a break while the person you care for remains in their home with a trained person who will look after them.

Sometimes, the service will include taking the person you care for out for a short walk.

With a sitting service, you are usually offered a break of several hours, either on a one-off basis, or a regular arrangement of set hours each week.

Sitting services are provided by registered agencies, whose staff will have received training to ensure that they can provide the appropriate level of care in your absence.

Sitting services are also provided through voluntary organisations.

Night sitting service

It is important to get some uninterrupted sleep so that you are able to continue your caring. Some organisations provide a trained carer who can stay over to take over your caring responsibilities.

Help in crisis services

This is a one-off sitting service which may be available at short notice for carers needing immediate relief due to illness, exhaustion, distress or other family crisis.

Day care services

There are alternatives to someone coming to your home.

The person you care for may be able to spend a morning, afternoon, or day at a day centre, a residential home or a nursing home, depending on their needs and the level of care they require.

Day care can provide an opportunity for company, educational, occupational and leisure activities, outings and a meal.

Some day care services are managed by the council; others by the health authority; and others by voluntary organisations.

Day care in a residential or nursing home setting

Day care in a residential or nursing home setting can often be more flexible in terms of time - and can start at 7am and end at 10pm.

Meals are provided, and activities similar to those at day centres arranged.

Personal care, such as bathing, is also available.

Overnight or weekend breaks can also be arranged, and can act as an introduction to a home where short stays could be taken at a later date.

Day care services for children

There are various types of day care services for children with disabilities. This can include day nurseries, family centres, playgroups, and playschemes.

Some schools also have after school clubs.

Contact the children with disabilities team for further information:

Children with Disabilties Team
Phoenix House
10 Wandsworth Road
London SW8 2LL
Telephone: 020 7926 5555

Longer breaks

The person you care for can spend time away in a residential or nursing home, or hospice, depending on the level or type of care needs.

This can be for a weekend, week or fortnight as needed, and can be booked in advance to ensure that both carer and cared for receive regular respite.

It may also be possible for someone to come and 'live in' with the person you care for, to take over your caring tasks whilst you take a break for a few days or longer.

Breaks away

Some people with mental health problems may be eligible for a break away in a hotel which offers specialised care.

Breaks together

Sometimes both you or the person you care for would like a break together. This could be taken in many parts of the country where there are hotel facilities catering specifically for people with nursing or care needs.

Carers are able to relax and enjoy a holiday whilst someone takes over their caring tasks. The advantage of this is that both of you have a holiday.

Hospice care

If you are caring for someone who is terminally ill they may be eligible for a short stay in a hospice.

Contact us

If you are an adult carer, and would like to receive support from Lambeth adults' and community services, phone us on 020 7926 5555, and we will put you through to the right team.

Downloads

AttachmentSize
doc Carer of the year nomination form40.5 KB