We are responsible for installing road humps in the borough, and for making stopping up orders and traffic orders.

Sections in this guide (click title to view)

1. Road humps

We place notices in the London Gazette and South London Press when we intend to implement new pedestrian crossings and speed humps. We also fix notices to street furniture such as lamp posts.

Traffic orders are not required for these type of works.

2. Procedures involved in giving public notice of road humps

  • Before we can provide road humps, we are required by law to publish a notice of our intention to do so in the local newspaper (South London Press and London Gazette) and by displaying notices in the roads concerned.
  • We are also legally obliged to consult the Police, Fire Brigade, Ambulance Service and organisations representing road users (for example the AA, the RAC, the London Cycling Campaign, the Pedestrian Association, the Freight Transport Association, the Road Haulage Association and bus companies) and organisations representing people who are likely to be affected by the road humps.
  • If we think it appropriate, we may hold a local inquiry.

Can I object to the road humps?

Yes, you may object within a period of 21 days which starts on the day that the notice of intention is published in the local newspaper and displayed in the roads concerned.

During the 21 day objection period, you may view a drawing showing the location of the proposed road humps between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm, Mondays to Fridays (Bank Holidays excluded) at:

Transport and Highways Team
3rd floor of Blue Star House
234-244 Stockwell Road
London
SW9 9SP

Any objection to road humps is considered by us before a decision is made on whether or not to go ahead and provide the humps. In due course you will be notified in writing of the our decision.

If it is decided to provide the road humps, can I still object?

No, it is not possible to make an objection if the objection period has expired or, if your objection has been considered and a decision has been made.

3. Stopping up orders

A stopping up order may be made to close a road for redevelopment purposes (providing certain planning permissions have been granted).

Once a stopping up order is made, the carriageway and/or footway concerned ceases to be public highway and may be built upon.

4. Procedures involved in making a stopping up order

We are required by law to publish notices in the local newspaper (South London Press and London Gazette) and to display notices in the road concerned (notices are fixed to lamp columns or other street furniture).

  • We are obliged to make a copy of the order and other relevant documents available for public inspection.
  • We are required to consult the Police, Fire Brigade, Ambulance Service and organisations representing road users (for example the AA, the RAC, the London Cycling Campaign, the Pedestrians Association, the Freight Transport Association, the Road Haulage Association and bus companies).
  • We are obliged to get the agreement of any undertaker who has apparatus under the road to be stopped up and the owner of any property which adjoins the road to be stopped up. (NB check with service area what this final bullet point means)

Where can I see a copy of a stopping up order?

Between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm, Mondays to Fridays (Bank Holidays excluded) at:

London Borough of Lambeth
Transport and Highways Team
5th floor, Blue Star House
234-244 Stockwell Road
London
SW9 9SP

Object to a stopping up order

When we give our notice of intention to make the order in the local newspaper and on the roads concerned, you may make an objection or other comment within 28 days of the day that the notice is published.

Any formal objection to a stopping up order is considered by us before a decision is made on whether or not to proceed with the order. Any objections which have not been withdrawn may result in a local inquiry being held before the order can be made.

If the council decides to make the order, despite objections, can I continue to object?

No, this is not possible. But, once the order is made, if you believe that we have acted outside of its powers or that we have not carried out the correct legal procedures in making the order, then you may apply to the High Court within six weeks of the date that the Order was published and ask the Court to quash the order.

5. Traffic orders

A traffic order is a legal document which imposes traffic and parking restrictions such as road closures, one-way streets, banned turns, bus lanes, mandatory cycle lanes, waiting and loading restrictions (yellow lines), controlled parking zones and on-street parking places.

There are three types of traffic order:

  • temporary orders
  • experimental orders
  • permanent orders.

Temporary orders are imposed to close roads or to restrict traffic and parking so that works can be carried out either on a road or near a road (such as on a building site or redevelopment site). They may also be imposed where there is the likelihood of danger to the public (for instance if debris is falling from a building). Temporary orders can continue in force for up to 18 months or until the works have been completed if that is sooner. Temporary orders may also be used to restrict traffic and parking for a special event, such as a street party or a sporting event that happens on the road. These may continue for up to three days.

Experimental orders can restrict traffic and parking for up to 18 months and while they are in force their effect is monitored and assessed (and changes made if necessary), before we decide whether or not to continue the experimental order on a permanent basis.

Permanent orders are made to restrict traffic and parking for an indefinite period. They may be cancelled if necessary, but it is unusual for this to happen unless there is a major change in traffic conditions.

6. Procedures involved in making a traffic order

We are required by law to publish notices in the local newspaper (South London Press and London Gazette).

Also we may attach notices to lamp columns or other street furniture in the roads concerned and we may consult with residents and businesses in the roads affected.

  • In the case of experimental and permanent traffic orders, we are also obliged to make a copy of the order and other relevant documents available for public inspection.
  • Before we make an experiment or permanent traffic order, we are also legally obliged to consult the Police, Fire Brigade, Ambulance Service and organisations representing road users (for example the AA, the RAC, the London Cycling Campaign, the Pedestrian Association, the Freight Transport Association, the Road Haulage Association and bus companies).
  • In certain special circumstances we may hold a public inquiry.

Where can I see a copy of a traffic order?

Between 9.30 am and 4.30 pm, Mondays to Fridays (Bank Holidays excluded) at:

Transport and Highways Team
3rd floor, Blue Star House
234-244 Stockwell Road
London
SW9 9SP

Object to a traffic order

Temporary traffic order
It is not possible to lodge a formal objection to a temporary traffic order. If you have any comment or complaint about a temporary traffic order you should still contact us so it can be investigated.

Experimental traffic order
It is not possible to lodge a formal objection to an experimental traffic order until it is in force. Once it is in force, objections may be made to the order being made permanent and these must be made within six months of the day that the experimental order comes into force. If the experimental order is changed, then objections may be made within six months of the day that the experimental order is changed.

Permanent order
We have to give public notice of its intention before the permanent order comes into force and invite objections or other representations. These must be made within 21 days of the day that the public notice appears in the South London Press and London Gazette and in the roads concerned.

Any formal objection to a permanent order or to an experimental order being continued on a permanent basis is considered by us before a decision is made on whether or not to make the relevant order. The objector is then notified in writing of our decision.

If the council decides to make the traffic order, despite objections, can I continue to object?

No, this is not possible. But, once the order is made, if you believe that we have acted outside of our powers or that the we have not carried out the correct legal procedures in making the order, then you may apply to the High Court within 6 weeks of the date that the Order was made and ask the Court to quash the order.