Covid-19 stats

A summary of the Covid-19 situation in Lambeth.

Covid-19 key information

COVID-19 will be a feature of our lives for the foreseeable future, we need to learn to live with it and manage the risk to ourselves and others. To find out how to stay safe and help prevent the spread of coronavirus please read the guidance published on the UK  government website

Latest updates and guidance: what you can do to stay safe and prevent the spread of coronavirus

The most up to date data are presented in the two links below:

We will be updating these data links as frequently as the source data allows. Please note as the changes around the national guidance occur, there will be changes in the number of positive cases reported. As such, the reported incidence of COVID-19 in Lambeth may not be an accurate reflection of the actual incidence in Lambeth.

How are the number of cases counted?

The number of cases shown in these tables is taken from the UK Government Covid-19 dashboard. Using their definition, positive cases are identified by a positive laboratory result from specimens taken from people within the United Kingdom.

Lambeth's public health team receive data from the UK Health Security Agency for all positive cases in Lambeth, using this we determine the total number of cases and the population rate (the number of cases for every 100,000 people in Lambeth).

How are the number of deaths counted?

Death data comes from three sources (NHS England, UK Health Security Agency, data linkages to the NHS Demographics Batch Service), this identifies as many people with a confirmed case who have died as possible. These sources are combined and any duplicate records are removed.

The number of deaths in England includes all deaths previously reported by NHS England, but also includes other deaths of patients who were confirmed cases, whether they died in a hospital or elsewhere.

What is an R value?

The reproduction number (R) is the average number of people who become infected from a single infected person.

If the published R number is 1, on average every person who is infected is infecting one other person, this means the total number of infections is stable and the disease is not going away.

If the published R number is greater than 1, on average every person who is infected is infecting more than one other person, this means the total number of infections is increasing and the disease is spreading.

If the published R number is less than 1, on average every person who is infected is not infecting anybody else, this means the total number of infections is decreasing.

The R number can and will change, as it is affected by the number of contacts between people. The fewer contacts there are between people reduces the chance of transmission of the disease.

What is the growth rate?

The growth rate reflects how quickly the number of infections changes day by day.

If the growth rate is zero, the epidemic is stable and not growing.

If the growth rate is greater than zero (+ positive), the epidemic is growing.

If the growth rate is less than zero (- negative) then the epidemic is shrinking.

Covid-19 Resources

Resource Link
Lambeth's Covid-19 hub Lambeth's Covid-19 hub
NHS information about coronavirus NHS information about Coronavirus
UK Government coronavirus dashboard Coronavirus dashboard
Lambeth outbreak and control plan Lambeth outbreak and control plan
Government Office for Science Government Office for Science
Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies

More detailed information on how the R-value and the growth rate value are calculated is available from the OGS page.

The data summarized in these tables are taken from a number of different sources.

Resource Link
Case numbers and death data Uk case numbers and death data
R and growth rates R and growth rates are from OGS and SAGE